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Stories From NPR

"Hearing it changed everything for me," former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman told NPR on Friday.

Manigault Newman was referring to what she calls the "N-word tape" — a long-rumored but never surfaced tape of Donald Trump on the set of The Apprentice allegedly using the racial slur. In her interview with NPR's Rachel Martin, Manigault Newman claims to have heard the tape and heard Trump using that slur on the tape.

But that's not what it says in her tell-all book, Unhinged, due out on Tuesday.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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With Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr)

Mueller. Midterms. Manafort’s trial continues. Iran sanctions reimposed, and the trade war with China escalates. Our news roundtable takes it all in.

With Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr)

You might not know it from the craft brew pubs everywhere, but Americans are drinking more wine and spirits — slowly pushing aside beer. We’ll find out why.

The economics of disability (encore)

Aug 10, 2018

Roughly one in five Americans has a disability. Those numbers increase with age and vary across race and gender, but every single one of those people is carving out an economic life. In this hourlong special, we focused on three pillars of the economy: education, work and health care. 

Are Turkey's problems contagious?

Aug 10, 2018

It's rare that foreign exchange markets top the news, but when they do, it's never good. Turkey's currency, the lira, fell to record lows against the dollar as President Donald Trump hit the country with additional tariffs on steel and aluminum. We'll break down what happened and try to figure out if other countries should be worried. Then, we'll talk to a business near the wildfires that closed down Yosemite National Park during peak season. Plus: The sun sets on the celebrity chef restaurant.

The business behind celebrity auctions

Aug 10, 2018

As a public school teacher in New York City, Richard Andino isn't making boatloads of money. But that doesn’t stop him from attending celebrity auctions.

At a Park Avenue sale last month, he dropped five grand on a gold watch once owned by the mid-century jazz legend Art Tatum, known as one of the greatest piano players of all time.    

“It’s something that belonged to my idol,” Andino said. “So it’s worth it.”

Andino, who’s 53 and plays piano himself, has been obsessed with Tatum since he was a teenager. That’s why he’s willing to pay up.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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