Chas Sisk | Nashville Public Radio

Chas Sisk

Senior Editor

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 and became an editor in 2018. Previously, he covered state politics for Nashville Public Radio and The Tennessean, and he’s also reported on communities, politics and business for a variety of publications in Massachusetts, New York and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University, where he studied economics and journalism.

Ways to Connect

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Republican Bill Lee and Democrat Karl Dean continued to keep their campaigns civil Tuesday night in Kingsport, where the two held their second debate.

They largely passed up on direct attacks, but there were some places where they sought to highlight their contrasting views.

Courtesy The White House

The looming vote on Brett Kavanaugh's appointment to the Supreme Court has been a growing political issue.

But rather than sway Tennesseans, the debate surrounding whether Kavanaugh committed sexual assault when he was a teenager seems to be causing people to dig in their heels.

Screenshot of Republican Convention / TN Photo Services

The polls show Tennessee's Senate race between Congressman Marsha Blackburn and former Gov. Phil Bredesen is neck and neck. That makes events like last week's debate at Cumberland University all the more crucial.

During the debate Bredesen and Blackburn highlighted some important differences as they tried to make their final cases to voters. WPLN's Chas Sisk and Sergio Martínez-Beltrán have been covering the race, and they sat down with Jason Moon Wilkins to talk about why this race is taking on national implications.

U.S. Department of Energy

Marilyn Lloyd, a Chattanooga politician hailed for shattering barriers to women, died Wednesday night at age 89.

Lloyd was the first woman from Tennessee elected to a full term in Congress, a feat that by itself would have made her a pivotal figure in the state's history. But Lloyd went on to serve 10 terms, retiring in 1994.

FILE / TN Photo Services

Randy Boyd, a Republican businessman and longtime ally of Gov. Bill Haslam, has been nominated to serve as the interim president of  the University of Tennessee, following the decision of the system's current leader to move up his retirement.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

A faith-based group in Nashville that aims to reduce recidivism officially opened a new campus in Antioch Tuesday, nearly a decade after first proposing the complex in another part of Davidson County.

Bill Lee for Tennessee/Karl Dean for Governor

One of the first major polls of the Tennessee governor’s race shows a pretty sizeable advantage for the Republican nominee. But it also highlights a question being asked across the state: Who are these guys?

A recent poll found that more than a quarter of likely voters are either unsure about or have never even heard of Williamson County businessman Bill Lee. Nearly a third are unfamiliar with former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean.

Bill Lee for Tennessee/Karl Dean for Governor

Over the past year, WPLN has been asking the candidates for governor where they stand on topics important to Tennessee voters.

Now that former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean, a Democrat, and Williamson County businessman Bill Lee, a Republican, have clinched their parties' nominations, we're pulling their answers together. Read on to see what they think about a dozen key issues.

Bird scooter Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Mayor David Briley has signed legislation that opens the door to the return of dockless scooters and ride-sharing bikes to Nashville's streets and sidewalks.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee is joining 15 others to try to overturn a recent ruling that found sex discrimination laws cover transgender people.

Attorney General Herbert Slatery made the announcement Tuesday. He and his colleagues want the U.S. Supreme Court to overrule a decision issued earlier this year by the federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over Tennessee. It decided in favor of a transgender employee who was fired by a Michigan funeral home for refusing to abide by its dress code.

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