Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

News Director

Emily Siner is the news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

Emily began at the station in 2014 as an enterprise reporter. She soon launched the station's first podcast and has since helped the station develop a whole fleet of shows with live events. She became the newsroom's assistant news director in 2016 and news director in 2017.  She has been named the Associated Press Radio Journalist of the Year and has received two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for her reporting.

Emily is passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she's not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

It can be hard to understand what's going on inside other people's heads. But that's Karl Sillay's line of work — not as a therapist, but as a neurosurgeon. He tells WPLN's Emily Siner as part of our live series Movers & Thinkers, his experience working with patients' brains gives him a deep appreciation for that vital organ.


Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

How does technology affect our brain? Suzana Herculano-Houzel has spent years trying to figure this out, and the Vanderbilt neuroscientist tells WPLN's Emily Siner during our live series Movers & Thinkers it's actually responsible for an important part of human evolution.


Courtesy of Julie Fortune

The rain may be cancelling many outdoor events, but not for the Jewish community in Middle Tennessee.

This week marks the harvest festival of Sukkot, where people build temporary structures that are very much not rainproof.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

There's still quite a bit we don't know about what happens when the brain starts to deteriorate. And that can be frustrating for someone who works with people with Alzheimer's and other dementias. Nashville gerontologist Beverly Patnaik talked to WPLN's Emily Siner about this in our live series Movers & Thinkers.


vote Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The polls opened in Nashville at 7 this morning, allowing voters a final chance to cast ballots in the special runoff contest for vice mayor.

This time there’s only one item - selection for the city’s next vice mayor, who will serve out the remaining year of the current term.

Poll officials estimate that just 30,000 votes may come in — a low number they attribute partly to voter fatigue, and the fact that the only contest on this ballot is for vice mayor. 

Nashville voting booth
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The busiest voting locations for the Nashville vice mayoral runoff election were — perhaps unsurprisingly — the home bases of the two candidates running.

As early voting wrapped up over the weekend, the leading polling places were in Green Hills, the former district of councilman Jim Shulman, and Bellevue, which is represented by acting Vice Mayor Sheri Weiner.

Every human is fortunate to have this organ inside our skull called the brain. It allows us to breathe, create art, develop new technology — and yet there's much that is undiscovered about how these masses of neurons work. Why is everyone's brain a different shape? When the brain starts to deteriorate, what's really happening? And what is thought? 

Courtesy of Music Theory Examples by Women

A website that promotes female classical composers is criticizing the Nashville Symphony for not performing works written by women.

Courtesy of Volunteer State Community College

Community colleges in Tennessee are likely to see an influx of adult students as they start classes in the coming days, thanks to the official rollout of the Tennessee Reconnect grant. Higher education officials say the number of adult learners at some colleges could increase by 50 or 60 percent. 

Courtesy of Abey Lissane

Hundreds of Ethiopian immigrants and their families held a rare show of religious unification in South Nashville on Sunday, after more than a quarter century of division.

The community is seeking to reconcile a political and religious rift 12,000 miles away that has had a real impact on Nashvillians.

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