Meribah Knight | Nashville Public Radio

Meribah Knight

Reporter

Meribah Knight is a journalist who recently relocated to Nashville from Chicago, where she covered business, the economy, housing, crime and transportation.

Most recently she was a staff reporter with Crain’s Chicago Business covering manufacturing in the Rust Belt, aviation and transportation. Prior to Crain’s she was a staff reporter with the Chicago News Cooperative, producing the Chicago section of The New York Times. There she covered a wide range of topics from arts & culture to education to poverty. She was an adjunct lecturer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. 

Her writing has appeared The New York TimesThe New YorkerO, The Oprah MagazineUtne Reader, American Craft, Chicago Magazine, Crain’s Chicago Business and The Chicago Reader. Her radio and multimedia work has been featured on WBEZ, The PBS News Hour and Chicago Public Television. 

A native of Cambridge, Mass., Meribah has a Masters of Journalism from Northwestern University and a BA from New York University. She lives in Donelson with her husband, a photojournalist with the Tennessean, and their four cats. 

Ways to Connect

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

A white Nashville officer is under intense scrutiny after fatally shooting a black man while he was fleeing, allegedly with a gun.

Now, as Officer Andrew Delke faces a homicide charge, one Vanderbilt doctoral candidate has crunched more than a year of his traffic stop data, which suggests some trends in his style of policing.

DAVIDSON COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE

When Nashville's District Attorney's office decided to seek a bench warrant for the arrest of Officer Andrew Delke, charging him with criminal homicide for the fatal shooting of Daniel Hambrick, it put into play a more winding legal process.

It still needs to determine what type of homicide Delke will be charged with, if any.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

The Metro Council approved a substantial settlement Tuesday over an allegation of police misconduct. It's one of the larger payouts in nearly a decade, mainly because the woman arrested fought every step of the way.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

  

Tucked away on a leafy side street in East Nashville, Lockeland Elementary Design Center is ranked the fourth-best in the district. But in recent years, the student body at Lockeland has gone from half African-American to nearly all white. It's a shift so stark that a group of parents say the school must do something to change it.

Joe Buglewicz for WPLN

The last radio story in this series reveals the scope of The Promise, WPLN's special podcast series. Reporter and producer Meribah Knight spent over a year reporting on life in the James Cayce Homes, Nashville's largest public housing complex.

Courtesy of Tonya Shannon

There is a saying in Nashville’s James Cayce Homes: “Get some gone.”

Three simple words that describe the urge, the mission, to move out and start anew, far away from the city’s largest public housing project.

Some do leave. But it's not easy, especially with the city's rising cost of rent. "I mean, half of us, we can't afford to move up out of here. Get some gone," says Big Man, a Cayce resident since 1999.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

The relationship between James Cayce residents and Nashville police is a tenuous one. In this story, we explore two defining moments in Cayce: A viral cell phone video of a police officer being assaulted, and the most controversial police shooting in the city’s recent history.

Both were caught on camera. And both reveal the strain between the people who live in Cayce and the people who patrol it.

Joe Buglewicz for WPLN

After Big Man, a resident of Nashville's largest public housing complex, the Cayce Homes, meets his wealthy white neighbors up the hill, a friendship blooms. It's the last thing he expected to happen. For months this house, an imposing white modern structure, had nagged at him. It's very presence threatened his sense of place in this rapidly gentrifying neighborhood.

Joe Buglewicz for WPLN

This is a story about the assumptions we all make. And the secrets we all keep.

Big Man, a public housing resident from the Cayce Homes, has a nagging feeling about a fancy new modern-looking home one block over from him. To Big Man, this house signifies everything threatening him and his family: gentrification, a rapidly changing city, the wealth taking over the neighborhood, and a multi-million overhaul of the housing project that he's called home for nearly two decades.

John Ingram Martha Ingram
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN (File photo)

The Metro Council advanced the ordinances required to build a new stadium for a Major League Soccer team Tuesday night and abandoned efforts to put the project up for a vote as a ballot initiative.

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