Affordable Housing | Nashville Public Radio

Affordable Housing

Nashville soccer rendering
MLS2NASHVILLE

One of Nashville’s most intense debates ended Tuesday night with a series of votes that approved the construction of a Major League Soccer stadium at the city fairgrounds.

Nashville soccer stadium rendering
Courtesy of MLS2Nashville

Nashville’s pursuit of a Major League Soccer stadium for its fairgrounds property took two steps forward on Monday night and set the Metro Council on a path toward decisive votes on Sept 4.

Joe Buglewicz for WPLN

This is a story about the assumptions we all make. And the secrets we all keep.

Big Man, a public housing resident from the Cayce Homes, has a nagging feeling about a fancy new modern-looking home one block over from him. To Big Man, this house signifies everything threatening him and his family: gentrification, a rapidly changing city, the wealth taking over the neighborhood, and a multi-million overhaul of the housing project that he's called home for nearly two decades.

Stacey Irvin / Metro Arts Commission

A series of dinners starting Thursday in North Nashville and running through Saturday is taking aim at gentrification.

On the menu — hot chicken — and it won't come cheap: Diners are being asked to pledge $100 a piece.

John Ingram Martha Ingram
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN (File photo)

The Metro Council advanced the ordinances required to build a new stadium for a Major League Soccer team Tuesday night and abandoned efforts to put the project up for a vote as a ballot initiative.

Courtesy of MDHA

Nashville’s housing agency is about to submit its five-year plan to the federal government, and much of it centers on overhauling two more public housing developments in South Nashville.

In recent years, MDHA has refocused on its original mission of building affordable housing rather than civic projects. The document is long and epically wonky, but it illuminates the city's priorities. 

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Despite Nashville's budget shortfall, Mayor David Briley is now promising to preserve the city's only dedicated fund for affordable housing.

Joe Buglewicz for WPLN

Nashville's housing authority says that by summer's end every single unit of public housing in the city will no longer be traditional public housing.

It's part of a sweeping overhaul of Nashville's low-income developments, many of which date back to the late 1930s. The bold concept means asking the federal government to hand over the title on every single piece of public housing, essentially turning the city into a private landlord.

Joe Buglewicz

Nashville's housing director Jim Harbison says he isn't worried quite yet about the federal government's proposal to raise rents for low income households. Responding to U.S. Housing Secretary Ben Carson's controversial plan, Harbison said it's too early for his office to take the proposal seriously.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

A group of Metro Council members are looking for yet another way to stem the loss of affordable housing in Nashville. It involves keeping a close eye on the numbers.

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