Arts and Culture | Nashville Public Radio

Arts and Culture

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The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee heard comments on a significant piece of music legislation Tuesday that many in the industry thought would never make it this far. The legislation is a collection of bills, including multiple elements of music copyright reform, that lawmakers say would result in more income for copyright owners.

Jack Corn / Courtesy of the Frist and The Tennessean

Some of the closest witnesses to the Nashville Civil Rights movement were photographers from the city's two major newspapers at the time, The Tennessean and the Nashville Banner. A selection of their photos — and the Frist Art Museum's latest exhibit that displays them — offer a glimpse into how media outlets chose to cover the events.

Courtesy of Vanderbilt University

The former Vanderbilt football player most likely to be taken early in this year’s NFL Draft was a campus leader, actively involved in social issues. In the past, that might have been seen as a positive by prospective NFL teams, but Oren Burks has found this year is different.

Joe Nolan


The Pikes Project began in 2015 with the publishing of a photo essay of Gallatin Pike on the WPLN website. Three years later, we're five pikes long and rolling through an ongoing intermedia experiment that includes poetry broadcasts and performancesregional and local art exhibitions, contributing interactive communities connected through an Instagram account, and a place in Metro Arts' permanent public art collection

Joe Nolan

Joe Nolan wrote and read this poem as a radio companion to his new photo essay on Lebanon Pike, part of his ongoing series the Pikes Project

In the poem, we count 12 references to things you can see along the pike. Can you catch them all? 

 

Jason Mrachina via Flickr

The Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville has officially changed its name. While the re-branding is subtle, the museum hopes the shift will bring more visitors inside.

Courtesy of Country Music Association

The Country Music Hall of Fame welcomed three new inductees today, including an artist who some saw as being long overlooked. 

Bluegrass mandolin player Ricky Skaggs and fiddler Johnny Gimble were inducted along with Dottie West — widely considered a country music pioneer. West's fans have clamored for her inclusion in the Hall of Fame for years. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

Players with the Nashville Symphony are giving up their personal instruments for a concert this weekend and instead playing what are called the Violins of Hope — a collection of about two dozen string instruments that were once owned by Jews who survived the Holocaust. 

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