Arts and Culture | Nashville Public Radio

Arts and Culture

courtesy Country Music Hall of Fame

One of Nashville's most prolific hit-makers died Sunday. Mel Tillis spent the last year dealing with intestinal issues, according to his publicist. He died at a hospital in Ocala, Florida, at age 85.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

When people think about how they want to be remembered after they die, they often envision a headstone in a cemetery. It's intended to preserve the most important details of their life for generations to come.

That's why Fred Zahn with the Metro Historical Commission spends some of his time finding and restoring unmarked graves at the Nashville City Cemetery. Zahn talked to WPLN's Emily Siner for our live series Movers & Thinkers about the power of marking one's legacy.


CMA World

The Country Music Association lifted its ban on questions about the Las Vegas tragedy around noon on Friday after growing social media outcry from musicians and journalists.

"CMA apologizes for the recently distributed restrictions in the CMA Awards media guidelines, which have since been lifted. The sentiment was not to infringe and was created with the best of intentions to honor and celebrate Country Music."

Caleb Shiver / WPLN

More and more musicians are going old-school when they record — using reel-to-reel tape machines. But manufacturers aren't producing these massive devices anymore, and the used machines that are still functioning are hard to come by.

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum turns 50 this year, but it may have never made it to year one without the unlikely leadership of two women in an industry dominated by men. 

Kyle Dean Reinford

WPLN's Jason Moon Wilkins speaks with Jeremy Larson, aka Violents, before a rare, live performance in Nashville Thursday night.

Rick Diamond / Getty Images for Americana Music

Musician and actress Rhiannon Giddens has been awarded one of the MacArthur "genius grants" for her work "reclaiming African-American contributions to folk and country," the institution says.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

As a young girl, Amy Mears always looked up to her father, who was a Southern Baptist preacher. Mears is now a pastor herself — of a Nashville church. And she talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our live series, Movers & Thinkers, about what it was like to take up her father's profession at a time when women were almost forbidden from doing so.


Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Every instrument that Manuel Delgado makes in Nashville bears a logo with his last name. Delgado Guitars. He learned from his father, who learned from his father, who started a luthier business in Mexico in the early 1900s. Manuel talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our live series Movers & Thinkers about that extra sense of responsibility he feels because of the family legacy.


Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Parents pass on their genes, their values — and sometimes, their careers. These guests have taken on the family business, which has connected them more to their parents but, at times, tested their relationships and created lofty expectations. Featuring third-generation luthier Manuel Delgado, second-generation pastor Amy Mears, and poet Caroline Randall Williams, who has written books with her mother. 

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