Arts and Culture | Nashville Public Radio

Arts and Culture

Courtesy of Jay Kholos

In 1920, a Jewish family moved from New York to Union City, Tennessee. It was a novel enough occurrence that, nearly a century later, their story has been adapted into a musical, called "Jew Store," which is coming through Nashville this weekend.

And while the name may sound provocative, it also illuminates an often forgotten piece of Southern history.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Odd as it may seem, Gallatin, Tennessee has good reason to embrace a new spray paint mural that features skateboarding. The artwork depicts the late local hero Ray Underhill — who became Tennessee’s first professional skater in the 1980s — and it could be the spark for more street art across the city.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

Talking to college students about death might not seem like the most comfortable conversation, but that is Andrea Mills' job. She teaches a death and dying psychology class at Lipscomb University, where she delves into how people deal with the end of life. She talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers about what's unique to our culture and time, and what seems to be universal.

Mack Linebaugh / WPLN

Some families watch football together. Others have a special cranberry sauce they make every year. But here at WPLN, our annual Thanksgiving tradition is a little nerdier: We give you a list of our favorite podcast episodes of the year, because we can't keep all of this audio storytelling joy to ourselves.

StoryCorps

When Michael Turney and his sister Betty Turney-Turner stopped by the StoryCorps booth in Nashville last year, they both talked about the values and work ethic they learned from their parents: stick up for yourself, even in the face of blatant discrimination.

courtesy Country Music Hall of Fame

One of Nashville's most prolific hit-makers died Sunday. Mel Tillis spent the last year dealing with intestinal issues, according to his publicist. He died at a hospital in Ocala, Florida, at age 85.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

When people think about how they want to be remembered after they die, they often envision a headstone in a cemetery. It's intended to preserve the most important details of their life for generations to come.

That's why Fred Zahn with the Metro Historical Commission spends some of his time finding and restoring unmarked graves at the Nashville City Cemetery. Zahn talked to WPLN's Emily Siner for our live series Movers & Thinkers about the power of marking one's legacy.


CMA World

The Country Music Association lifted its ban on questions about the Las Vegas tragedy around noon on Friday after growing social media outcry from musicians and journalists.

"CMA apologizes for the recently distributed restrictions in the CMA Awards media guidelines, which have since been lifted. The sentiment was not to infringe and was created with the best of intentions to honor and celebrate Country Music."

Caleb Shiver / WPLN

More and more musicians are going old-school when they record — using reel-to-reel tape machines. But manufacturers aren't producing these massive devices anymore, and the used machines that are still functioning are hard to come by.

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum turns 50 this year, but it may have never made it to year one without the unlikely leadership of two women in an industry dominated by men. 

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