Health Care | Nashville Public Radio

Health Care

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courtesy Neighborhood Health / via Facebook

A drug that has been increasingly abused by opioid users is becoming harder to access in Tennessee, designated as a controlled substance starting July 1.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Nashville's in-school clinics for teachers and their families are successfully reducing health care costs. According to a new study led by the nonprofit RAND Corporation, primary care delivered within Metro Schools saves more than $700 a year for every teacher who uses it.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Health workers in Nashville have turned their focus to homeless people amid a growing outbreak of hepatitis A and some of the first diagnosed cases among people living on the streets. They're finding it takes some convincing to get many to agree to a vaccination.

Leon Brocard / via Flickr

No one's sure exactly why Tennessee's rate of teen pregnancy took a nosedive in the most recent figures, but their best guess: more kids are abstaining from sex. Tennessee's teen pregnancy rate has dropped for the last two decades as the national figure has also declined.

Lee Coursey / via Flickr

Tennessee's agency that administers food stamps and cash assistance programs says it has fundamentally altered its approach: designing programs to benefit entire households, rather than choosing between children and their parents.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The Nashville Hospital Authority gave their CEO a favorable performance review Monday night — while apologizing for it being his first evaluation since being hired in 2015. The board also decided to keep him on for three more years, and to give him raises, though not starting until next year, citing the city's current budget crunch.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

A nursing home chain with more than two dozen facilities in Tennessee has settled a $230 million Medicare fraud case. 

The government's investigation launched in 2014 when two whistleblowers started collecting evidence on their own.

Brian Todd / Metro Public Health

Nashville's newest display of public art could easily be overlooked: an antique crib and highchair, littered with baby bottles. It's in the lobby of the Lentz Public Health Center, and the artwork speaks to the ways racism has harmed public health.

courtesy Pexels

Tennessee doctors are getting a crash course in the state's new restrictions on opioids ahead of the law taking effect July 1. Physicians are concerned about new liability since the prescribing rules do away with much of their discretion.

courtesy Patrick Whelan

Bonnaroo is not the ideal setting for someone in recovery from addiction. Every year, there are dozens of drug arrests, sometimes big ones, and alcohol-related illnesses or even hospitalizations. But hundreds of sober concert-goers now gather each year to enjoy the music substance-free.

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