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courtesy Barbershop Harmony Society

The Barbershop Harmony Society is inviting women to be full members of the organization for the first time, effective immediately. The Nashville-based umbrella group says the decision is part of a "new strategic vision" meant to be more inclusive and welcome people of all races, sexual orientations, political opinions and spiritual beliefs.

Carmen Hicks McCord
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Songs can go extinct. Lose track of the words, or the tune by which to sing them, and the oral tradition of passing on folk songs can become a precariously thin thread through history.

But one family — even one singing amongst themselves way out in the country — can do a lot of good. In Tennessee, the Hicks family of Fentress County single-handedly preserved numerous songs that would likely have vanished.

Senate.gov

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee heard comments on a significant piece of music legislation Tuesday that many in the industry thought would never make it this far. The legislation is a collection of bills, including multiple elements of music copyright reform, that lawmakers say would result in more income for copyright owners.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Supporters of a measure that would overhaul how songwriters get paid are still working to get it off the ground. The Music Modernization Act was unveiled in Congress late last year, but no action has been taken yet.

Kesha (Olivia Bee), R.LUM.R (artist), Margo Price (Danielle Holbert), Luke Bryan (artist)

It’s the end of the year and time for critics' picks, best of lists and top 10s — but we’re going to take a slightly different approach and ask a question: What did Nashville sound like in 2017?

Caleb Shiver / WPLN

More and more musicians are going old-school when they record — using reel-to-reel tape machines. But manufacturers aren't producing these massive devices anymore, and the used machines that are still functioning are hard to come by.

Quintron Weather Warlock Third Man Records total solar eclipse
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

To fully appreciate this eclipse story, WPLN recommends the audio version (above).

An experimental musician brought his weather-controlled synthesizer to the roof of Jack White’s Third Man Records in Nashville for the total solar eclipse. The so-called “Weather Warlock” made a soundtrack based on the atmospheric conditions of wind, temperature and sunlight.

Jeff Kravitz / FilmMagic

The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival is hoping to rebound from its worst attendance ever last year, and organizers are betting on a sound that’s a little different than what made the fest famous.

Emily Siner / WPLN

It's not a real Stanley Cup, but it will do for a town that loves music as much as Nashville. Shane Chisholm, an Americana bass player who moved here recently from Canada, has been building upright basses where the body is a homemade replica of the NHL Stanley Cup. The NHL, it turned out, wasn't happy about it.


Photograph: Ilpo Musto, By Permission From Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

When musician and poet Leonard Cohen died last year, there was little mention made of the time he spent in Tennessee. But the songwriter lived for nearly two years in a remote cabin outside of Nashville in the late '60s and early '70s, where he worked on songs like "Bird on the Wire" and "Famous Blue Raincoat."

Those who did mention of Cohen’s Tennessee period always brought up the cabin, which was located near Leiper's Fork. 

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