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The Tennessee legislative session came to a late-night end last week, but some of the bills approved in the final hours might not make it all the way to becoming law.

In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk discuss what legislation could miss the governor’s signature, as well as other lingering issues.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Wednesday's final day of the 2018 legislative session was chaotic, even by the usual frenetic standards of the Tennessee General Assembly.

Before lawmakers adjourned at about 11 p.m., the day featured a standoff between the House and the Senate over standardized testing, an attempt to hold the state budget hostage and plenty of last-minute legislative stratagems.

Here are three reasons why the final hours of the 110th General Assembly were so hectic:

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

Tennessee lawmakers wrapped up business Wednesday night, after an arduous final day at the state Capitol dominated by a standoff over TNReady and a dispute over a constitutional amendment.

The House of Representatives and the state Senate spent most of the day locked in a bitter dispute over whether teachers are really going to be protected from repercussions if this year's TNReady scores turn out to be flawed. Last week's exams were overshadowed by frequent interruptions. 

Janice Bowling
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee lawmakers have given initial approval to a resolution to amend the state constitution to say that "liberties do not come from government, but from Almighty God."

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The big debates appeared to be behind the Tennessee Legislature, which has been in a wrap-up phase for the last week or two. Then a move to "punish" Memphis and a cyberattack on standardized tests injected high drama into the final days of the session.

In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State, WPLN's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk look at why a budget decision stirred a national debate on race and how lawmakers addressed more trouble with TNReady.

House of Representatives
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

Tennessee lawmakers have approved a measure meant to protect students, teachers and schools from being penalized for irregularities in this year's TNReady test.

Both chambers of the state legislature swiftly passed the legislation this afternoon, just days after a suspected cyberattack caused computerized tests to shut down.

TN Photo Services

Tennessee education officials got a grilling Wednesday from state lawmakers about the suspected cyberattack that shut down standardized testing earlier this week.

But officials say they're not sure who would have tried to hack the TNReady tests — or why.

Ron Cogswell / via Flickr

The city of Memphis could lose a quarter-million dollars as punishment for removing statues of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest and Confederate President Jefferson Davis last year.

The Tennessee House of Representatives voted Tuesday to strip the money from next year's state budget. The sum had been earmarked to go toward planning for Memphis' bicentennial celebrations next year.

Alberto G. / via Flickr

Another round of problems with the state's standardized tests has Tennessee lawmakers considering ditching computers and going back to pencils and paper.

The proposal is one of several on the table as leaders grapple with an apparent cyberattack on the TNReady testing system.

Tennessee Department of Correction

A former prison nurse accused state officials Monday of covering up the circumstances of an inmate's death in 2013, laying out the allegations in testimony before a state legislative panel.

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