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Stories From NPR

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's bring in one of the senators now who was in that Judiciary Committee hearing room today questioning attorney general nominee Bill Barr. That senator is Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat of Rhode Island. Senator Whitehouse, welcome.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you, good to be with you.

KELLY: Good to have you with us. So let me start with the central question, whether Barr will protect the Mueller investigation. Based on what you heard today, are you persuaded that he will?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's bring in one of the senators now who was in that Judiciary Committee hearing room today questioning attorney general nominee Bill Barr. That senator is Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat of Rhode Island. Senator Whitehouse, welcome.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you, good to be with you.

KELLY: Good to have you with us. So let me start with the central question, whether Barr will protect the Mueller investigation. Based on what you heard today, are you persuaded that he will?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's bring in one of the senators now who was in that Judiciary Committee hearing room today questioning attorney general nominee Bill Barr. That senator is Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat of Rhode Island. Senator Whitehouse, welcome.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you, good to be with you.

KELLY: Good to have you with us. So let me start with the central question, whether Barr will protect the Mueller investigation. Based on what you heard today, are you persuaded that he will?

Twenty-three-year-old jazz pianist James Francies has his musical fingerprints all over the place. From leading his own group at 2019'sWinter Jazzfest in New York City to playing shows in Tokyo with guitar legend Pat Metheny, the current pace of Francies's life is constantly in motion.

"It just feels like you're on a plane," Francies says. "Four thousand feet, traveling six hundred miles an hour."

Last fall, Blue Note Records released Flight, Francies's debut album.

What consumers and other tech companies have against Apple's App Store

7 hours ago

App sales from Google Play and Apple’s App Store are estimated to be a part of a $101 billion industry. Both companies make a profit by charging developers a 15-30 percent fee every time a consumer purchases an app, a model that has sparked criticism from companies like Netflix, Amazon and Spotify. A group of consumers also filed a lawsuit over the fees, saying Apple has a monopoly on the app market, driving up prices. Their argument was heard by the Supreme Court in November.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's bring in one of the senators now who was in that Judiciary Committee hearing room today questioning attorney general nominee Bill Barr. That senator is Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat of Rhode Island. Senator Whitehouse, welcome.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you, good to be with you.

KELLY: Good to have you with us. So let me start with the central question, whether Barr will protect the Mueller investigation. Based on what you heard today, are you persuaded that he will?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's bring in one of the senators now who was in that Judiciary Committee hearing room today questioning attorney general nominee Bill Barr. That senator is Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat of Rhode Island. Senator Whitehouse, welcome.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you, good to be with you.

KELLY: Good to have you with us. So let me start with the central question, whether Barr will protect the Mueller investigation. Based on what you heard today, are you persuaded that he will?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's bring in one of the senators now who was in that Judiciary Committee hearing room today questioning attorney general nominee Bill Barr. That senator is Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat of Rhode Island. Senator Whitehouse, welcome.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you, good to be with you.

KELLY: Good to have you with us. So let me start with the central question, whether Barr will protect the Mueller investigation. Based on what you heard today, are you persuaded that he will?

Netflix is raising its prices on all streaming plans in the United States for new and existing customers. The most popular streaming option will be about $13, up from $11. The last time we saw a price hike, CEO Reed Hastings said incremental increases are needed to cover massive investment in creating original content. “Price is all relative to value,” he said. So it’s no surprise Netflix is still riding the invest more, charge more train. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

A media company that's owned by a hedge fund — and known for buying up distressed newspapers — has a new target. Digital First Media is offering $1.3 billion to buy Gannett Co., the publisher of USA Today, the  Detroit Free Press, and more than a dozen other newspapers. The hedge fund behind the Gannett bid — Alden Global Capital — isn't the only one interested in picking up pieces of the local news business: Fortress Investment Group and Chatham Asset Management also have significant investments in the sector, too.

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