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Stories From NPR

Audie Cornish speaks with Pastor Willis Johnson from Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Mo., about the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown case and the reactions he sees in his community. Read Pastor Willis Johnson's sermon for this coming Sunday, "Disgrace and Grace."

The movie adaptation of “The Giver” is released on DVD today. The beloved young adult book by Lois Lowry is the story of a seemingly utopian society where there is no suffering, no pain and no hunger.

But there is also no love or individual freedom, no color, no emotion. Everything and everyone is the same. In this world, only one man holds all the memories and emotions of the past. The book follows a young boy named Jonas, who is chosen to become the next person to receive those memories.

After the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown rocked the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Mo., hip hop radio personality Jowcol “Boogie D” Dolby turned off the music and opened the phone lines to the people of Ferguson.

Here & Now spoke with Dolby back in August, and now, months later, host Jeremy Hobson checked back in at Dolby’s studio to ask him about how the community is reacting to news of a grand jury’s decision not indict the police officer responsible for the shooting.

The Food and Drug Administration announced new rules today that will require various businesses that sell food to post calorie counts on their menus.

The rules encompass chain restaurants, amusement parks, convenience stores and movie theaters, among other businesses, and have been lauded by public health officials.

In the record industry, it's not too early to be releasing Christmas albums, and Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has been listening to a lot of them. He's narrowed down his list of goodies to these four: A Merry Friggin' Christmas soundtrack, Christmas at Downton Abby, Earth Wind and Fire's Holiday and the Living Sisters' Harmony is Real.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Major studios once churned out scores of great-person biographical pictures. But now you rarely see them except during awards season. They're prime Oscar bait. The new Stephen Hawking biopic, The Theory Of Everything, is a perfect specimen. It's a letdown, finally, but Eddie Redmayne is amazingly tough. He captures the fury inside Hawking's twisted frame.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

As the holiday buying season approaches, retailers remain open to the same attack — called a "point of sale" attack — that hit Target and Home Depot, security experts say. Those analysts say that retailers have their fingers crossed, hoping they're not next.

And leading companies are keeping very tight-lipped about what, if anything, they're doing to protect customers.

Is This Store Hackerproof?

It's easy to spot a scratched face on a watch. It's much harder to tell if the checkout machine that you swipe to pay for that watch is defective.

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