Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

News Director & Host

Emily Siner is the news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

Emily began at the station in 2014 as an enterprise reporter. She soon launched the station's first podcast and has since helped the station develop a whole fleet of shows with live events. She became the newsroom's assistant news director in 2016 and news director in 2017.  She has been named the Associated Press Radio Journalist of the Year and has received three regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for her reporting.

Emily is passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she's not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Jim Bare never used to spend his Friday nights working on math. Now, he does it willingly — often with the rest of his family.

In September, Jim, 65, signed up for his first semester of Volunteer State Community College under the Tennessee Reconnect program. His daughter also enrolled there. So did her husband. And her mom.

For them, college this fall has been a family affair. 

Kara McLeland / WPLN

Pat Postiglione is something of a legend in his field. The retired Nashville police detective developed a reputation for cracking some of the grizzliest cold cases in the city's history — homicides that sat unsolved for years. In our live series Movers & Thinkers, Postiglione talked to WPLN's Emily Siner about getting to the bottom of difficult cases.

"Relationships change," he says, "so now that witness who was an alibi witness for that suspect may no longer want to be."


Courtesy of Frances Cutler Hahn

During the eight-day-long holiday of Hanukkah this week, Jewish families in Nashville are retelling the story of the holiday: the Maccabees fighting against a ruler that was persecuting Judaism, an oil lamp that burned miraculously in the Temple for eight days.

Ultimately, says Frances Cutler Hahn, it's a story of religious freedom. And Hahn knows too well what it's like when that freedom is taken away. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

Former Nashville news anchor Demetria Kalodimos is accusing WSMV and its parent company of age and gender discrimination.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville hotel prices hit their highest point ever last month: The average daily rate in October for the region was $162.55 per night, according to the travel data company STR.

Jed Dekalb / Courtesy of UT System

The president of the University of Tennessee system is retiring this week, leaving behind campuses with growing enrollment and strong budgets. For the past eight years, Joe DiPietro has overseen three campuses, a health sciences center and extension offices in every county of the state.

Donn Jones/CMA

Roy Clark, one of the hosts of the country music variety show Hee Haw and a legendary Nashville musician, has died.

Clark was 85 years old and died in Tulsa, Okla., of complications from pneumonia, according to his publicist.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Nashville will be home to a new distribution hub for the retail giant Amazon, bringing 5,000 corporate jobs to the city in what public officials are describing as the "single largest jobs commitment" in the state's history.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

How does a cold case homicide detective maintain faith in humanity? What makes him so sure that he’s going after the right bad guy? And how can a case with no known suspects be solved? For more than 25 years, retired police detective Pat Postiglione solved some of the most gruesome murder cases in Nashville. This, he says, takes a toll: “If you stay in homicide long enough, it definitely has an effect on your personal life.”

Emily Siner / WPLN

Nashville rabbis urged more than a thousand people Monday night to speak out against hateful words and actions following the shooting in Pittsburgh.

The memorial service included a song played on one of the Violins of Hope — instruments that survived the Holocaust — and the lighting of 11 memorial candles adorned with Stars of David, to commemorate the 11 victims of the attack. 

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