Sergio Martínez-Beltrán | Nashville Public Radio

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán

Political Reporter & Host

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán is Nashville Public Radio’s political reporter and host of The Tri-Star State podcast. Before moving to Nashville, Sergio covered education for the Standard-Examiner newspaper in Ogden, Utah. He is a Puerto Rico native and his work has also appeared on NPR station WKAR, San Antonio Express-News, Inter News Service, GFR Media and WMIZ 1270 AM. 

In his free time (once in a blue moon), Sergio can be found playing volleyball or in Flamenco Beach in Culebra, Puerto Rico. He is a graduate of Michigan State University and the coolest uncle (feel free to fact-check) to Olivia and Jimena. 

Nashville voter registration
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Today — Oct. 9 — is the last day before the November election to register to vote in Tennessee, and in Davidson County, officials say more people are signing up.

The uptick could be attributed to the number of community groups doing outreach, including the Tennessee Black Voter Project, a state coalition trying to register 55,000 people of color.

Screenshot of Taylor Swift's Instagram post.

The conversation around Taylor Swift’s endorsement of Democrat Phil Bredesen even got the President's attention.

President Donald Trump — who has campaigned for Republican Marsha Blackburn in the Tennessee senate race — told reporters that Swift’s endorsement has made him like her music 25 percent less.

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán / WPLN

If you ask Dan Pomeroy how he feels about the new Tennessee State Museum, you can immediately see how excited he gets.

Pomeroy is the chief curator of the museum, a project funded mostly through $120 million appropriated by the state legislature. After two and a half years of construction next to the Nashville Farmers' Market, the new standalone building will finally open its doors to the public Thursday.

Screenshot of Republican Convention / TN Photo Services

The polls show Tennessee's Senate race between Congressman Marsha Blackburn and former Gov. Phil Bredesen is neck and neck. That makes events like last week's debate at Cumberland University all the more crucial.

During the debate Bredesen and Blackburn highlighted some important differences as they tried to make their final cases to voters. WPLN's Chas Sisk and Sergio Martínez-Beltrán have been covering the race, and they sat down with Jason Moon Wilkins to talk about why this race is taking on national implications.

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán / WPLN

A political action committee formed in Tennessee aims at preventing Republican David Byrd of Waynesboro from being reelected to the state House of Representatives.

Screenshot of Republican Convention / TN Photo Services

The first Senate debate between Republican Marsha Blackburn and Democrat Phil Bredesen focused on a political back and forth — whether the Tennessee race would determine who ultimately leads the chamber. 

But the candidates also commented on several issues directly affecting Tennesseans, including the closure of hospitals across the state and gun rights.

TN Photo Services

Democratic candidate Phil Bredesen pledged that, if elected to the U.S. Senate, he is not going to support the top Democrat.

His remarks were made during an often feisty debate Tuesday night at Cumberland University.

Elliott Wenzler / WPLN

Metro Nashville Public Schools is hoping for more community involvement as part of the solution to support its lowest-performing schools.

The plan, which was shared at a press conference Monday morning, uses a four-part approach that includes better supporting school leaders, developing student and family support through community partnerships, strengthening instructional coaching, and supporting teachers. 

Courtesy Metro Nashville Public Schools (File)

Twenty-one Metro Nashville schools, as well as the district itself, are on the state’s list of low performers. The announcement was made Friday afternoon by the Tennessee Department of Education.

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán / WPLN

Karl Dean, the Democratic candidate for governor, told attendees at a luncheon Thursday afternoon that, if elected, he will focus on turning around the economy of struggling small towns.

The remarks were part of what was meant to be an event with both gubernatorial candidates, organized by Farmers Insurance Group.

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