Affordable Care Act | Nashville Public Radio

Affordable Care Act

Bill Lee for Tennessee/Karl Dean for Governor

Democrat Karl Dean is banking on Medicaid expansion as his winning issue in Tennessee's race for governor, while Republican Bill Lee claims the plan would be detrimental. The opposing views represent the sharpest divide between the candidates.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The Secretary of Health and Human Services addressed Nashville health care executives Thursday, announcing that premiums for individual plans on the Affordable Care Act will drop for the first time. Alex Azar said the rates, nationwide, dipped 2 percent after consistent year-over-year increases. Tennessee dropped even more, for the first time.

FILE / WPLN

The fiercest attacks in Tennessee's pivotal Senate race have centered on health care, and perhaps that's not by chance. Recent polling from NBC/WSJ puts the issue at the top of concerns for American voters.

TN Photo Services

Tennessee's top Republicans are watching a lawsuit meant to strike down the Affordable Care Act with mixed emotions. Tennessee is one of 20 states that joined the litigation led by Texas. The first oral arguments occur in a Fort Worth courtroom today.

But the legal argument justifying another court challenge to the ACA is "as far-fetched as any I've ever heard," Senator Lamar Alexander said in June.

istock

Wednesday is looking like yet another pivotal day in the life-or-death saga that has marked the history of the Affordable Care Act.

The Tri-Cities in Northeast Tennessee have the country's highest rates of pre-existing conditions, according to an analysis of metro areas by the Kaiser Family Foundation. More than four-in-ten adults — 41 percent — have a condition that could have precluded them from buying health insurance prior to the Affordable Care Act.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

Tennessee has joined 20 Republican-led states in asking the courts to overturn the Affordable Care Act. The lawsuit filed in Texas on Monday contends that without the individual mandate, Obamacare is unconstitutional.

(Archived photo)
Chas Sisk / WPLN

Gov. Bill Haslam is voicing some frustration about the prospects for health care reform following the failure of the latest plan to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is cheering the latest effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, while opponents of the measure are scrambling to derail it before the legislation can pass the U.S. Senate.

Haslam joined 14 other Republican governors Wednesday in signing a letter praising a plan to repeal the ACA's individual mandate, to do away with the requirement that individuals purchase insurance and to convert Medicaid to a system of so-called block grants to the states.

In an appearance in Chattanooga, Haslam called the proposal, known as Graham-Cassidy, a "home run for Tennessee" because the state will receive more money than it currently does for Medicaid.

U.S. Senate

Gov. Bill Haslam urged Congress Thursday morning to adopt a short-term fix to health insurance markets while continuing to work on bringing down medical costs over the long haul, as he joined four other governors at a hearing before a Senate committee.

Appearing before the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee, Haslam said Congress has an obligation to pass legislation that would encourage insurers to keep selling plans on exchanges set up through the Affordable Care Act. If not, millions of Americans would lose coverage.

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