Bill Lee | Nashville Public Radio

Bill Lee

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Republican Bill Lee and Democrat Karl Dean continued to keep their campaigns civil Tuesday night in Kingsport, where the two held their second debate.

They largely passed up on direct attacks, but there were some places where they sought to highlight their contrasting views.

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán / WPLN

Karl Dean, the Democratic candidate for governor, told attendees at a luncheon Thursday afternoon that, if elected, he will focus on turning around the economy of struggling small towns.

The remarks were part of what was meant to be an event with both gubernatorial candidates, organized by Farmers Insurance Group.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

Republican businessman Bill Lee wasn't known to many Tennesseans before this year's race for governor. He'd been a major fundraiser for the GOP. But he'd never run for public office of any kind.

Lee touts that as a virtue.

In the latest in a series of interviews with the six leading candidates for governor, Lee sat down with WPLN's Chas Sisk.

Donald Trump
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

President Donald Trump traveled to Nashville Tuesday to support Congressman Marsha Blackburn in her bid for the U.S. Senate, but Republican hopefuls up and down the ballot sought to tie themselves to Trump in the hope that his popularity will rub off this fall.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

As a state lawmaker, Republican Mae Beavers frequently proposed legislation to do away with handgun carry permits. And as a candidate for governor, her position is unchanged.

She believes there are already enough strings attached to gun purchases, so the permit process is pointless.

Martin Alonso / via Flickr

Tennesseans have softened their opposition to medical marijuana in recent years, and the candidates for governor reflect that change in public opinion.

Although none is calling to legalize cannabis outright, several say the state should consider allowing it for people who have serious health issues.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The question of whether immigrants brought to the United States as children should qualify for in-state tuition has divided Tennessee Republicans in recent years.

But the five major GOP candidates for governor all see it the same way: They're against it.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The Republican candidates for governor are saying they'd compel cities in Tennessee to enforce immigration laws if elected.

That comes amid a national debate over whether being picked up for minor offenses should also carry the risk of deportation.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Republicans in Rutherford County gathered Thursday night for their annual Reagan Day dinner.

Such events are primarily fundraisers for the party. But this year, they're also playing an important role in shaping the field to succeed Gov. Bill Haslam.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Williamson County businessman Bill Lee officially announced Monday that he's entering the race for governor, hoping to become the first person in 40 years to take the position without ever having held elected office.

Lee kicked off his campaign on Nashville's Bicentennial Mall. The chairman of Lee Company, a Middle Tennessee facilities management and home services company, rolled out a recreational vehicle that he plans to take around the state to introduce himself.

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