Craig Fitzhugh | Nashville Public Radio

Craig Fitzhugh

Chas Sisk / WPLN

As a state lawmaker, Republican Mae Beavers frequently proposed legislation to do away with handgun carry permits. And as a candidate for governor, her position is unchanged.

She believes there are already enough strings attached to gun purchases, so the permit process is pointless.

Martin Alonso / via Flickr

Tennesseans have softened their opposition to medical marijuana in recent years, and the candidates for governor reflect that change in public opinion.

Although none is calling to legalize cannabis outright, several say the state should consider allowing it for people who have serious health issues.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The question of whether immigrants brought to the United States as children should qualify for in-state tuition has divided Tennessee Republicans in recent years.

But the five major GOP candidates for governor all see it the same way: They're against it.

Craig Fitzhugh
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

The Tennessee legislature is in horse trading mode as it nears final votes on Governor Bill Haslam's signature infrastructure funding bill, which includes a gas tax increase along with cuts to taxes on groceries and manufacturing. Passage will almost certainly require the help of Democrats. And minority party leaders have decided to offer their votes in exchange for support of an educational endowment.

Alberto G. via Flickr

Teachers in Tennessee are on track to get some temporary relief from the pressure of testing.

The state House of Representatives has approved a plan put together by Gov. Bill Haslam to change the weighting of test scores for two years. The governor says the break is needed while the state replaces the TCAP with a new standardized test.

The plan, House Bill 108, temporarily rewrites Tennessee's teacher-evaluation formula.

Nadya Peek via Flickr

Voting absentee could become a lot easier in Tennessee.

A plan making its way through the legislature would let anybody cast their ballot by mail, no questions asked. Current state law requires voters to give a reason when they apply for an absentee ballot, but the excuses can be wide-ranging.