Nashville Transit Referendum | Nashville Public Radio

Nashville Transit Referendum

Credit Nashville Mayor's Office

On May 1, 2018, Nashville voters rejected a referendum that would have led to a large-scale overhaul of the city's public transit system.

In the lead-up to that vote, WPLN broke down key details of the 55-page transit improvement program — also billed as "Let's Move Nashville" —  with ongoing coverage.

Explanatory stories included:

For future Nashville transit proposals, bookmark WPLN.org/transit.

bus Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Much of the discussion around Nashville’s transit proposal focuses on five light rail lines outlined by the plan. Yet those routes would be ready, at the earliest, beginning in 2026.

Much sooner — if voters approve the referendum on May 1 — the initial changes would focus on improving countywide bus service, at a cost of nearly $1 billion.

Nashville bus MTA
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville’s mass transit vote is fast-approaching. In the meantime, the Metro Transit Authority has been rolling out incremental improvements — and, so far, liking the results.

Nashville bus
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville is now less than a month away from the start of early voting on its mass transit referendum. Voters will decide whether to raise four types of taxes to create a dedicated funding stream for a multi-billion-dollar overhaul to public transit.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Both sides in the debate over Nashville's proposed mass transit plan say the referendum scheduled for May 1 should go forward, despite Mayor Megan Barry's surprise announcement Tuesday that she's stepping down after pleading guilty to felony theft in connection with her extramarital affair.

Nashville transit
Nashville Mayor's Office

It’s official: Nashville voters will get the chance to decide whether to raise taxes to pay for the mayor’s plan for mass transit.

The Metro Council finalized a referendum Tuesday night so that increases to four kinds of taxes will appear on the ballot on May 1.

Nashville bus
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Organized with matching shirts, stickers and consistent talking points, a diverse coalition turned out Tuesday night in support of Nashville Mayor Megan Barry’s mass transit proposal.

Mayor Megan Barry nashville
Mayor's Office of Nashville

There’s been a steady stream of Nashville transportation announcements lately, along with studies and op-ed articles. Now the public gets the chance to comment on the city’s multi-billion-dollar mass transit proposal.

Nashville Charlotte Avenue
nMotion

After drawing some criticism, Mayor Megan Barry is now proposing a longer light rail line along Charlotte Avenue between downtown and West Nashville.

Nashville transit
Nashville Mayor's Office

As Nashville Mayor Megan Barry argues in favor of a tax increase to fund mass transit, she’s now taken a shot at critics of her plan. In a talk Monday to the Rotary Club of Nashville, the mayor called out what she considers three myths being pushed by opponents to her plan.

autonomous vehicle photo
nMotion

It was a coincidence that couldn’t be ignored. Nashville officials were a few hours away from casting a final vote in favor of a new transportation plan — nearly two years in the making — when they entered a downtown banquet hall to hear a speech from a visiting entrepreneur last month.

“By 2030, every vehicle will be electric, self-driving, and shared,” Stanford University lecturer Tony Seba said to a high-powered crowd of hundreds.

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